INDUSTRY NEWS

Coronavirus Resource Page

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

INALA has compiled the following resource directory to provide information from CMS, ISDH, CDC and the EPA in one location. This is not, and should not, be considered an all-inclusive resource. Please check ISDH, CMS and CDC websites frequently, as information and/or directives are being released almost daily.

 

From Argentum

Resources, links, and suggested best practices for a thoughtful approach to coronavirus (COVID-19) preparation and response in senior living communities.

Access the coronavirus toolkit here

 Prepare Now

  1. Argentum’s What You Can Do Now – checklist
  2. Review infection prevention and control policies and procedures from the CDC
  3. Review emergency preparedness plan with staff and expect ISDH survey’s to be more narrowly focused on infection preparedness.  Read more from CMS.
  4. Have a Communication Plan for all stakeholders.  Download The World Health Organization Communications Package

Resource Directory

EPA Releases List of Disinfectants to Use Against COVID-19

EPA’s Emerging Viral Pathogen Guidance was developed and finalized in 2016 to allow for a rapid response in the event of an emerging viral pathogen outbreak. It was triggered for the first time ever for SARS-CoV-2 on January 29, 2020. The guidance outlines a voluntary, pre-approval process for making emerging viral pathogens claims. In the event of an outbreak, companies with pre-approved products can make off-label claims (for example in technical literature, non-label-related websites, and social media) for use against the outbreak virus.

VIEW THE LIST HERE

CMS Guidance for Nursing Homes  VIEW HERE

ISDH Long Term Care Newsletter / Special Issue:  COVID-19 / Coronavirus

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Division of Long Term Care is providing facilities with information related to COVID-19.  It is recommended that facilities review this information and use it to educate staff and visitors.

Additional questions please contact LTC Deputy Director Tammy Alley at talley@isdh.in.gov or 317.233.7441, or LTC Director Brenda Buroker at bburoker@isdh.in.gov or 317.234.7340.

CMS Announces Actions to Address Spread of Coronovirus

CMS calls on all health care providers to activate infection control practices and issues guidance to inspectors as they inspect facilities affected by Coronavirus.    READ MORE

Additional Resources

Strategies to Prevent Spread in LTC Facilities

Getting your workplace ready for COVID-19

Good time to review infection control policies

Video Chatting with Grandma

Study finds video chatting is the best technology to prevent loneliness in seniors reports US News and World Report.

Study says Tai Chi most effect exercise to combat dementia.

A meta-analysis of 20 studies on tai chi and cognition determined tai chi appears to improve executive function without any cognitive decline, reports Newsmax.

2018 INALA Award Winners

Check out this year’s winners!

INALA Conversations: Dementia and Guns – Part Two

If an individual’s dementia has progressed to the point that conversation is not possible due to the disease or lack of judgment, than it is important that family members take action to safeguard the individual and others in the home.

In this situation, here are some tips for dealing with firearms in the home:

The best option is removal of firearms before there is a major safety concern. But if that cannot happen then consider:

  • Store all guns separately from ammunition in a secured and locked case or firearm vault.
  • Remove ammunition from the house.
  • Do not allow the person with disease to have unsupervised access.
  • If guns are in the home, other adults in the home should make it a priority to learn proper and safe handling of the guns.
  • Consider having an adult child, neighbor or friend “borrow” or “store” the guns permanently. Make sure you follow the laws on how to legally transfer gun ownership.
  • Have the guns leave the house for “professional cleaning.”
  • Have a professional disable the guns. This could still present risk if law enforcement ever becomes involved. They must act with the belief a gun is operational.
  • Go through a licensed firearms dealer if the guns are to be sold.
  • If you want law enforcement to destroy the guns and ammunition, call first and find out what is required. Do not simply walk into the station carrying the guns you want destroyed. They may want to see a statement of diagnosis from a physician and they can give you instructions on how to bring in the guns or whether they will send someone to collect the guns.
  • Indiana has a “red flag” law which allows immediate and temporary seizure of weapons from a person who poses a threat to themselves or others. Contact law enforcement anytime you think there is an imminent threat.

With appreciation to the California Central Coast Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association for most of these tips!

Resources:

https://consumer.healthday.com/cognitive-health-information-26/alzheimer-s-news-20/when-do-you-take-guns-from-someone-with-dementia-733653.html

https://www.agingcare.com/articles/should-seniors-be-allowed-to-keep-guns-169994.htm

https://www.seniorhomes.com/w/guns-in-senior-living-communities/

INALA Conversations: Dementia and Guns

The best time to have a conversation about firearms in the house is BEFORE there is a major safety concern!

For an individual living with dementia, gun ownership may represent security, pride in a skill gained and honed over time, treasured memories of a lifetime of gun ownership and a mark of responsible adulthood.

As dementia progresses the individual affected will experience a decline in judgment skills, memory, perception and reasoning. The individual’s ability to act safely may be impaired in a variety of situations like driving, using power tools or cooking. Just as difficult conversations may have to occur around these activities, similar conversations should happen around guns.

These can be highly emotional discussions and decisions. To get you started, you should know:

  • As dementia progresses, information and training in safe gun handling skills may fade.
  • Some people with dementia experience changes in personality and emotions.
  • Dementia affects the ability to control emotion and emotional outbursts can occur.
  • People with dementia may mistake someone they know for someone else, like an intruder.
  • Depression is common in those with dementia and can increase the risk of suicide if there is access to a means, like a firearm.
  • In later stages of dementia, people may suffer from delusions and hallucinations, some of which can be paranoid, persecutory or hostile.

You and the person experiencing dementia can come up with a plan as to how guns should be handled as the disease progresses. You might discuss a “firearms retirement or early inheritance date.” Or the person experiencing dementia might designate someone they trust to have the authority to take away their guns when the time comes.

Whatever you and your loved one chooses to do, as the disease progresses, continual reassessment of safety issues will be needed. If dementia is creating risk, neglecting to address gun safety could result in tragedy.

Resource:

https://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/news/20140721/guns-dementia#1